ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNINGS

Tomorrow’s leaders need to be equipped for tomorrow’s challenges, and we must adequately prepare our children for the future they will inherit. That requires a commitment to providing children with environmental education that helps them become the educated thought leaders of tomorrow.
Research suggests that environmental education brings a slew of benefits to students. A few key findings include:

• Studying EE Creates Enthusiastic Students, Innovative Teacher-Leaders – EE offers opportunities for rich, hands-on, real world and relevant learning across the curriculum (Archie, 2003).

• EE Helps Build Critical Thinking, and Relationship Skills – Environment-based education emphasizes specific critical thinking skills central to “good science”—questioning, investigating, forming hypotheses, interpreting data, analyzing, developing conclusions, and solving problems (Archie, 2003).

• EE Instructional Strategies Help Foster Leadership Qualities – Environmental education emphasizes cooperative learning (i.e., working in teams or with partners), critical thinking and discussion, hands-on activities, and a focus on action strategies with real-world applications (NAAEE & NEETF, 2001).

• Self Control/Self Discipline Benefits for Children with ADD – Taylor and her colleagues found that children with attention-deficit disorder (ADD) benefited from more exposure to nature –the greener a child’s everyday environment, the more manageable are the symptoms of ADD (Taylor, 2001).

• Increased Focus/Improved Cognition – Wells observed that proximity to nature, access to views of nature, and daily exposure to natural settings increases the ability of children to focus and improves cognitive abilities. (Wells, 2000).

• Health Benefits – At the school environment level Bell and Dyment observed that children who experience school grounds or play areas with diverse natural settings are more physically active, more aware of good nutrition, more creative, and more civil to one another. (Bell, 2006).

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]

PHP TRAINING FOR BEGINNERS

Learn PHP from the basics, through cutting edge topics, and on to certification. Each course offers real-life examples and interactivity to provide a robust and hands-on training experience, to sharpen your skills and add new development practices.
Our Courses are taught online with a live instructor. Classes can also be taught onsite or in a classroom setting (availability based on geography).
In this PHP and MySQL training course you’ll join master trainer Mark Lassoff as you learn all of the major concepts that beginner PHP developers need to master. You’ll be able to code along with Mark as he demonstrates everything from simple PHP commands to more advanced database applications. Each lesson features a companion lab exercise, which will help you retain, reinforce and remember each concept in the course.

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]

THE PHP I: FOUNDATION COURSE

Foundations course is designed to provide non-programmers with a solid foundation in the PHP language. This course guides you through the basics of PHP with an experiential approach, filled with numerous examples and hands-on exercises, including substantial practice in coding parts of a functional application – an online inquiry app. All of the exercises are designed to reinforce key language concepts.
You will also have the opportunity to use the Zend Studio PHP IDE (Integrated Development Environment) to start your coding adventures the easy and correct way!
This course is designed for those who want to learn the basics of the PHP language, and assumes some familiarity with web sites – what they are and the very basics of how they work – but no programming experience. Web designers who want to become PHP Developers would certainly benefit from this course. This class will provide you with a brief overview of concepts common to programming languages, and then teach you the rules and best practices of coding in the PHP language, at a beginning level.

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]

THE PHP II: HIGHER STRUCTURES

Foundations course is designed to provide non-programmers with a solid foundation in the PHP language. This course guides you through the basics of PHP with an experiential approach, filled with numerous examples and hands-on exercises, including substantial practice in coding parts of a functional application – an online inquiry app. All of the exercises are designed to reinforce key language concepts.
You will also have the opportunity to use the Zend Studio PHP IDE (Integrated Development Environment) to start your coding adventures the easy and correct way!
This course is designed for those who want to learn the basics of the PHP language, and assumes some familiarity with web sites – what they are and the very basics of how they work – but no programming experience. Web designers who want to become PHP Developers would certainly benefit from this course. This class will provide you with a brief overview of concepts common to programming languages, and then teach you the rules and best practices of coding in the PHP language, at a beginning level.

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]

ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNING

Tomorrow’s leaders need to be equipped for tomorrow’s challenges, and we must adequately prepare our children for the future they will inherit. That requires a commitment to providing children with environmental education that helps them become the educated thought leaders of tomorrow.

Research suggests that environmental education brings a slew of benefits to students. A few key findings include:

 

  • Studying EE Creates Enthusiastic Students, Innovative Teacher-Leaders – EE offers opportunities for rich, hands-on, real world and relevant learning across the curriculum (Archie, 2003).

 

  • EE Helps Build Critical Thinking, and Relationship Skills – Environment-based education emphasizes specific critical thinking skills central to “good science”—questioning, investigating, forming hypotheses, interpreting data, analyzing, developing conclusions, and solving problems (Archie, 2003).

 

  • EE Instructional Strategies Help Foster Leadership Qualities – Environmental education emphasizes cooperative learning (i.e., working in teams or with partners), critical thinking and discussion, hands-on activities, and a focus on action strategies with real-world applications (NAAEE & NEETF, 2001).

 

  • Self Control/Self Discipline Benefits for Children with ADD – Taylor and her colleagues found that children with attention-deficit disorder (ADD) benefited from more exposure to nature –the greener a child’s everyday environment, the more manageable are the symptoms of ADD (Taylor, 2001).

 

  • Increased Focus/Improved Cognition – Wells observed that proximity to nature, access to views of nature, and daily exposure to natural settings increases the ability of children to focus and improves cognitive abilities. (Wells, 2000).

 

  • Health Benefits – At the school environment level Bell and Dyment observed that children who experience school grounds or play areas with diverse natural settings are more physically active, more aware of good nutrition, more creative, and more civil to one another. (Bell, 2006).

 

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]

ART ADVENTURES

Designed specifically for the early elementary student, this class series will focus on the basic skill sets in visual art: Color, Line, Shades, Texture, Perspective. We will also cover several important artists in history. Lessons will make the learning fun, while creating various multi-media works including Drawing, Painting, Collage & Clay! (This class will be different from last year’s- both continuing and new students are encouraged!)

This course will introduce new skills and hone the basic practices of the middle-elementary-age art student: Color-Mixing, Paint Application, Drawing, Rendering and Composition. We will talk about how to the lay the groundwork for starting a painting. A study of Master Paintings will help us learn about Color and Harmonies, as well as the paintings’ importance in Art History. Contour drawings will strengthen Hand-Eye Coordination, and we’ll use Still-Life to study Form and Shadow. A chance to experiment and learn in the following mediums will be included over the classes: Pencil, Charcoal, Pastel, Watercolor & Acrylic Paints. Several artwork projects will be completed, including at least one canvas painting. All lead by one of Raleigh’s own well-known painters!

  • WRITING SKILLS

As humans, we all want to belong and feel connected – it is in our very nature as social beings. We want to be able to share our stories meaningfully and to hear other people’s stories in a way that resonates with our own lives.

Language is the tool that brings us together. Giving our children the gift of expression at a young age sets them on a path of purpose, intention and engagement. Writing will give your child a sense of herself as a person in the world and will give her a voice that she will be proud to share with the world. A study done by the U.S. Department of Education shows that writing is one of the best ways to not only improve your child’s academic progress in school, but to also improve your child’s self-expression and self-reliance. Two other studies show that writing improves children’s academic progress by helping them learn and retain new material better and – when done frequently both at home and at school – by building their confidence in their writing and communication abilities.

  1. Writing builds confidence in a child’s sense of herself and her voice.
  2. Writing helps kids create and strengthen their identities.
  3. Writing fosters a child’s emotional growth and gives him coping skills for dealing with life’s many highs and lows.
  4. Writing helps kids develop critical thinking skills – it helps them understand and communicate complicated ideas.
  5. Writing leads to guaranteed improvement in academic achievement.

 

  • PLAYGROUND

Playing outside is not just about letting off steam. It is a vital part of childhood that helps children develop physical strength, coordination and balance. It can also provide opportunities for children to learn and develop:

Social Skills – when they play with other children they learn to communicate, share, collaborate and empathise with others.

Imagination and creativity – outside play is often open-ended and children need to be creative about what and how games are played.

Thinking and problem solving skills – as children assess risks and tackle new challenges they learn about having a go, persistence and perseverance and the success those attributes can bring.

Sense of self – as they master new skills and play with other children they improve their competence and confidence in their own physical and social abilities.

Sense of connection – to place, to peers and to their local community and environment.

Self care skills – managing physical and social challenges helps children to learn about keeping themselves safe.

To support these broad learning outcomes, play spaces should include areas for active, free, quiet, social, imaginative, creative, exploratory and natural play. By inviting children to use their own initiative, explore possibilities and take chances we can provide them with opportunities to learn. Remember your own childhood – where was your favourite place to play?

 

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]

FOREIGN LANGUAGE SKILLS

In his book Style (Cassell, 1955), Lucas offered the following basic principles to “shorten that painful process” of learning how to write better.
Brevity
It is bad manners to waste [the reader’s] time. Therefore brevity first, then, clarity.
Clarity
It is bad manners to give [readers] needless trouble. Therefore clarity. . . . And how is clarity to be achieved? Mainly by taking trouble and by writing to serve people rather than to impress them.
Communication
The social purpose of language is communication–to inform, misinform, or otherwise influence our fellows. . . . Communication [is] more difficult than we may think. We are all serving life sentences of solitary confinement within our bodies; like prisoners, we have, as it were, to tap in awkward code to our fellow men in their neighboring cells.
Emphasis
Just as the art of war largely consists of deploying the strongest forces at the most important points, so the art of writing depends a good deal on putting the strongest words in the most important places.. One of the most important things, to my mind, in English style is word-order word.
Honesty
As the police put it, anything you say may be used as evidence against you. If handwriting reveals character, writing reveals it still more. You cannot fool all your judges all the time. Most style is not honest enough. Easy to say, but hard to practice. A writer may take to long words, as young men to beards–to impress. But long words, like long beards, are often the badge of charlatans. Or a writer may cultivate the obscure, to seem profound. But even carefully muddied puddles are soon fathomed.

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]

BECOME A PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Are you new to nature photography? Feeling a little unsure of how to get started in your quest to make beautiful images? If you want to consistently make good photos, there is a lot to learn. Fortunately, there are a tremendous number of resources out there to help you, but these can also be overwhelming to sort through. Here is an overview of the topics you will need to learn about from a nature perspective, and some guidance on the different resources available.

Let me start with a very basic statement. There is a difference between making a photo and taking a snapshot. Maybe it’s because most of us have had access to a camera for taking family snapshots since we were young, that it can take a while before that realization and transformation occurs (and sometimes it never does!). Making good photos is a “whole brain” experience. A technically perfect (left brain) image can still be unappealing if the artistic part is overlooked. But to achieve your vision (right brain) you need to know how to make the tools work. And it takes time to thoughtfully put all of it together to make the photo. Simply pointing and clicking will rarely get you there.

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]

POETRY COURSE

Phonics is a branch of linguistics where the sounds and physical properties of human speech sounds are studied. Phonics reading is highly essential in every child education. It is not uncommon to find parents who question the importance of phonics reading in the education of their children. Such parents believe that children will naturally master the different sounds of human speech since the ability to use language is innate in every human being. Their view may look plausible but they are not actually correct.

Indeed, phonics reading is very important in the education of children. The report of National Reading Panel indicates that teaching children phonics will help them in many ways in life. In the first instance, phonics reading is very important in helping children to learn how to spell words. It will be impossible for a person to spell any word correctly if the person is not able to recognize the sounds of the letters used in forming the words. When a child is taught phonics, the child will be able to recognize sounds in words and will be able to spell them correctly.

Children have problem in reading because they are not able to recognize the sounds of the letters of the alphabet in the words they read. Phonics reading will help children to recognize and associate sounds of the letters of the alphabet in the word they read. This will help them to improve in their reading skills and efficiency. In other words, it will be difficult for a child to improve in his reading skills if the teaching of phonics is removed from their curriculum.

Phonics reading helps also to increase a child’s fluency in reading. Fluency in this context is not limited to reading fast. It also means reading text accurately. When a child is taught phonics properly, the child will find reading easy. The child will not only read accurately but also quickly. Reading quick and correctly is another benefits of phonics reading.

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]

IMPRESSIONIST

Disappointed by their lack of success at official exhibitions, though not to an extent for them to give up, these artists decided to proceed without the Salon. They found their own ways to develop and exhibit their work. It may not have been as effective or promotional as incorporating with the Salon but it was a start.

In 1874, a group of artists got together and mounted their own exhibition as an alternative to the Salon. Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Berthe Morisot, Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas and Alfred Sisley were all part of this group. The struggle to obtain recognition among the group was challenging. The exhibit itself was not a success, but It was an important first step: the first independent group show of Impressionists art.

 

Though it may sound like the groups progress was failure and nothing good came about their exhibit, not all responses to the Impressionists were negative. Some critics liked their fresh approach to painting and wrote favorable reviews about their bizarre yet radical approach to their unique way of art.

Confidence of the Artist’s

Despite the criticism they received, the Impressionists were not distracted from their course. Their ambitions were to create art which they loved and created them with their very own unique styles that others found somewhat insulting. Their focus and Goals were to have Impressionism to be known, promoted and influenced to others to see a whole new side of art.

 

[cs_table column_size=”1/1″ table_style=”classic”] [table]
[thead]
[tr]
[th][/th]
[th]Timing[/th]
[th]Instructor[/th]
[th]Room[/th]
[/tr]
[/thead]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Monday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Scolar. Walter[/td]
[td]A-1234[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Tuesday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 12:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. James Bond[/td]
[td]B-1236[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Wednesday[/td]
[td]04:30Pm to 10:30Pm[/td]
[td]Painter. Jimalter[/td]
[td]Z-1014[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Thursday[/td]
[td]02:30Am to 09:00Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Jim Walter[/td]
[td]AB-134[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Friday[/td]
[td]11:30Am to 04:10Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Eric William[/td]
[td]A10-13[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Saturday[/td]
[td]09:30Am to 01:30Pm[/td]
[td]Prof. Ricky Price[/td]
[td]AL-165[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Sunday[/td]
[td]08:30Am to 09:30Am[/td]
[td]Prof. Alard William[/td]
[td]A-258[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table] [/cs_table]